Local Exhibitions

FIRST SKIM THROUGH THIS POST FOR UPDATED LOCAL EXHIBITIONS, THEN YOU MAY ALSO VISIT THE FOLLOWING ART BLOG AS AN ADDITIONAL RESOURCE: ARTERPILLAR ART GUIDE: SOUTH FLORIDA ART

“WOMEN’S PERSPECTIVES”

June 9  –  August 24

Dina Mitrani Gallery
2620 N.W. Second Ave., Miami, 786-486-7248, Dinamitranigallery.com

“Domestic Duality: by Patricia Schnall Gutierrez will be on exhibit at Dina Mitrani Gallery.

Women’s Perspectives is billed as a group exhibition of “photo-based work, where each piece has been conceived as a series. Consisting of four or more images each, they are examples of how multiple perspectives can better describe a concept, story, or narrative. The artworks in the exhibition are groupings that can work cinematically frame by frame in some cases, and in others, depictions of how fragmentation can complete an idea or visual expression.”

UM INCOMING MFA EXHIBITION

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES GALLERY

1201 STANFORD DRIVE (NEXT TO WESLEY FOUNDATION DIAGONALLY ACROSS FROM LOWE)

FRIDAY AUGUST 24, 5PM – 8PM

The new students are Devin Caserta (painting), Natalya Kochak (printmaking), Dennis Loucks (ceramics), Skylor Swan (ceramics), Jena Thomas (painting), John Van Beekum (photography)

Image Credit: Natalya Kochak, Day Six, 1:27pm, Mixed Media , 2012

Kimsooja: A Needle Woman

June 29 – August 26, 2012

MIAMI ART MUSEUM, 101 WEST FLAGLER STREET, MIAMI, FL 33130

(ACCESSIBLE FROM UM BY METRO RAIL, AT GOVERNMENT CENTER STATION)

Image: Kimsooja, A Needle Woman (Cairo, Delhi, Lagos, London, Mexico City, New York, Shanghai, Tokyo), 1999-
2001. Eight-channel video installation, silent. Duration: 6:33 minute loop. Courtesy of the artist.

Miami Art Museum is pleased to present A Needle Woman – a multi-channel video installation by Korean artist Kimsooja. This epic work consists of eight synchronized videos projected at large scale, each depicting a bustling area of a major metropolitan center: Cairo, Delhi, Lagos, London, Mexico City, New York, Shanghai and Tokyo. In each projection, a lone figure wearing neutral gray clothes stands utterly motionless with her back to the camera, as if braced against the human torrent of pedestrians that encircles her. With this simple gesture, the artist exemplifies the perennial struggle to preserve a place for the individual within contemporary society, while poetically embodying the experience of being engulfed within a foreign culture. In the process, she provides a vivid sense of globalization’s impact on cities throughout the world.

The presentation includes two closely related works by Kimsooja: In A Needle Woman – Kitakyushu, the artist lies prostrate atop a rocky peak as clouds swirl hypnotically above her, while in A Laundry Woman – Yamuna River, she stands at the banks of a sacred waterway in India, suspended amid an ethereal void created by the sky’s reflection on the river surface. Offering a direct counterpoint to the 21st-century urban landscapes depicted in the larger series, the pair creates a space of timeless serenity within the installation, a momentary respite from the frenetic energy that surrounds them.

Artist Talk by Regina Jestrow and Lucinda Linderman 
08/30/2012 
7:00 PM 

Coral Gables Museum, 285 Aragon Ave, www.coralgablesmuseum.org

Image: Lucinda Linderman

Enjoy a visual presentation by Regina Jestrow and Lucinda Linderman, featured artists in the current exhibit Upcycled: new life for discarded materials. Regina Jestrow uses old fabrics and dress patterns to create beautiful textile sculptures and installations playing with patterns, color, design, and the tradition of quilting. Originally from Queens, New York, Jestrow currently has a studio space at the ArtCenter/SouthFlorida on Miami Beach.

Lucinda Linderman creates sculptures from plastic that mimic nature, resulting in works that are ironic and suggestive of the nature cycle. Born in Chattanooga, Linderman currently is the artist-in-residence at the Deering Estate at Cutler, in Miami, where she has developed an eco-art internship/mentorship program with local high school students. Meet the artists and learn more about the inspirations and processes behind their work. More information about these artists may be found atReginaJestrow.com andupcycledobject.com

Admission: $5 general public || FREE for Museum members

 

RAGNAR KJARTANSSON: SONG

KNIGHT EXHIBITION SERIES

MAY 17 – SEPTEMBER 2, 2012

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

770 NE 125 STREET, NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FL

Museum of Contemporary Art Website 

You Tube Carnegie Museum of Art

Image: Ragnar Kjartansson, Song, HD Video, 2011

Ragnar Kjartansson: Song is the first solo US museum exhibition of the work of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. A musician as well as artist, Kjartansson (b. 1976) has been drawn to the theater and performance since he formed a band in his teenage years. The exhibition includes a selection of video works from the last decade.  Kjartansson’s videos reflect an interest in music and theater and the personae of its performers, often coupled with extreme environments. The End (2008) features two musicians in a mountainous snowy landscape, while Satan is Real (2005) finds the naked artist buried to his chest in the lawn of a public park, playing a guitar.

In addition to his video work, Kjartansson has become known for inhabiting galleries and more unexpected locations where he performs live, often for extended periods. For the 2009 Venice Biennale, he painted portraits of his friend, every day for six months, in a crumbling palazzo on Venice’s Grand Canal. Kjartansson’s approach wavers between besotted optimism and deadpan, sometimes unnerving, directness. Ritual, repetition, and an almost hallucinogenic reverie share the stage with humor, levity, and a charismatic impulse to entertain.   The exhibition is organized by Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh and is curated by Associate Curator Dan Byers.

ED RUSCHA: ON THE ROAD

MAY 24 – SEPTEMBER 2, 2012

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

770 NE 125 STREET, NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FL

Image: Ed Ruscha, California Grapeskins, Acrylic on Canvas, 38 1/8 x 68 1/8 in. ,  2009

Ed Ruscha, whose career spans five decades, is known for his use of language to document and comment on the shifting character of American culture.  Ruscha drew inspiration from the classic American novel On the Road by Jack Kerouac in his own limited art book version of the novel, and has created a new body of  paintings, drawings, and photographs.  The exhibition, organized by the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles is curated by Chief Curator Douglas Fogel.  Included is Ruscha’s artist’s book, six large paintings, and 10 drawings, each taking their text from the novel.  Just as Kerouac’s words provide Ruscha with new means to explore his archetypal landscapes, Ruscha’s art adds new analysis to Kerouac’s original and radical use of language.

Transcultural Pilgrim: Three Decades of Work by José Bedia

May 24 – September 2, 2012

MIAMI ART MUSEUM, 101 WEST FLAGLER STREET, MIAMI, FL 33130

(ACCESSIBLE FROM UM BY METRO RAIL, AT GOVERNMENT CENTER STATION)

MIAMI ART MUSEUM WEBSITE

Image: José Bedia, Utenu Kazaye, 2007. Acrylic on canvas. 180 x 454 cm. Collection of Roger and Mariela Tovar.

Miami Art Museum presents a major career retrospective of the work of José Bedia. The exhibition, consisting of 35 works including works on paper and canvas and two large-scale installations, explores Bedia’s ancestral genealogy (Cuba) and his constructed genealogy in the “other” Americas—the indigenous communities where this transcultural pilgrim has found so much deeply personal material for his spiritual and artistic practices. More

“Summer Reading”

TEXT BASED WORKS

July 14th – September 5th, 2012.
Opening event – July 14th, 5-9pm

Black Square Gallery

2248 NW 1st Place, Miami, FL 33127, Tel: +1 305 424 5002

Ryan McCann will exhibit in Summer Reading at Black Square Gallery

Six artists from USA, Italy, Argentina and Korea will present their works, objects and installations: Claire Satin, Kyu Hak LeePablo LehmannPatrizia GiambiRyan McCann, and Tony Vazquez

Wall Paintings: Installations by Arturo Herrera, Gavin Perry, Jen Stark and Roberto Behar & Rosario Marquardt

On view beginning November 30, 2011 – end of 2013Museum of Art / Ft LauderdaleOne East Las Olas Blvd, Ft Lauderdale, FL 33301MUSEUM OF ART FT LAUDERDALE WEBSITE

The Museum of Art has commissioned four art installations for the exterior of its building, the largest being a 30×50 foot mural by internationally-known Venezuelan painter Arturo Herrera that will grace the Bernard and Miriam Peck Terrace. Other artists include Gavin Perry, Jen Stark and husband and wife team Roberto Behar & Rosario Marquardt, each of whom have designed installations that will enliven all four sides of the Museum’s Edward Larrabee Barnes-designed modernist structure. It is anticipated that all four installations will be on view until the end of 2013.

Big Picture will open August 17, 2012, 7pm, at The Little Haiti Cultural Center in Miami, FL, at 212 NE 59th Terrace. Runs through September 14

Iris PhotoCollective is pleased to announce its groundbreaking exhibition Big Picture, a group show curated by photojournalist, Carl Juste, an alumnus of the UM School of Communication.

Big Picture will open August 17, 2012, 7pm, at The Little Haiti Cultural Center in Miami, FL, at 212 NE 59th Terrace. The gallery is approximately 2,100 square feet with high vaulted ceilings—a perfect venue with ample space for an exhibition of this magnitude. The exhibition will be up through September 14, 2012.

http://irisphotocollective.blogspot.com/2012/08/big-picture.html

The exhibition will display seventeen colossal images, about 8 ft x 10 ft each, by seventeen extraordinary photojournalists, ten of whom are part of the Miami Herald photo family, including Carl Juste, Pulitzer Prize winner Patrick Farrell, and John Van Beekum, a 2012 UM graduate student currently in UM’s MFA photography program.

The work will be featured in high-resolution quality and size that will make viewers feel like they are part of the scene, allowing them to experience the event first hand.  Each image is a physical manifestation of the expansion of meaning. The truth and relativity of the facts are the ingredients that expand the comprehension of the image. The viewer sees the larger context because they are drawn into the expanding frame, hence made to see the Big Picture.

For a few more details, here is an audio invitation by exhibit curator and fellow photojournalist Carl Juste and narrator Nancy Ancrum:

http://bitly.com/BigPicturePromo

Saintly Blessings

A Gift of Mexican Retablos from Joseph and Janet Shein
October 8, 2011 – September 23, 2012
University of Miami Lowe Art Museum
1301 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33124

Painted devotional images of saints and other holy persons, called retablos, are used primarily by Mexican peoples as objects of veneration and to seek favors. A splendid collection of twenty-eight retablos, painted on tin, has been graciously donated to the Lowe Art Museum by prominent Philadelphia and Miami art collectors, Joseph and Janet Shein. The gift is an important addition to the Lowe’s collection of santos.* They are on view for the first time at the Lowe.

When the Spanish came to the New World, they brought significant changes, one of the most lasting of which was their religion, Catholicism. As the desire to possess a sacred object that would ensure health, fertility, and abundance of crops led to a transfer of beliefs from pagan images to those of the Church, religious imagery appeared.

In the 19th century, as the Spanish colonial population increased in and around what are today Mexico and New Mexico, imported religious ornaments were not plentiful enough to satisfy the needs of these people, who very pious and dedicated to the church. Retablosresponded to the demand for devotional objects of worship used in every home, as well as in churches.

For believers, retablos are much more than images. They are imbued with a saint’s spirit, which can be invoked through devotion and prayer. Retablos are intermediaries between heaven and earth who can communicate with God on behalf of their devotees. Saints may be asked to help cure an illness, bring consolation for a loss, avert a disaster, or otherwise provide for the physical and psychological well-being of believers and their loved ones. A saint’s power arises from his/her ability to perform requested favors or miracles. Devotees are responsible for keeping the saint satisfied through acts of devotion, and by acknowledging publicly any favor received. Although retablos were hung and placed in churches, colonists also installed them in their homes, especially in the sala or living room, where they could be venerated daily.

This tradition continues today, even as retablosare recognized as an original and true folk art form, in demand by museums and collectors all over the world.

SHUTTER: SELECTED PHOTOGRAPHY AND FILM FROM THE CINTAS FOUNDATION FELLOWS COLLECTION

MAY 18 – OCTOBER 5, 2012  

NOON – 5PM

FREEDOM TOWER, 600 Biscayne Blvd, Miami

Shutter: Selected Photography and Film from the CINTAS Foundation Fellows Collection

Image: Snowscape with Owls, Anthony Goicolea

From the CINTAS Foundation Fellows Collection, billed as a show that “exemplifies the broad history and transformative mediums of still photography and film within the CINTAS Foundation Fellows Collection,” features more than 40 works by Anthony Giocolea, Felipe Dulzaides, Gladys Triana, Luis Gispert and other artists. The show runs through Oct. 5 in Freedom Tower. Regular gallery hours are noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

Introspection and Awakening:

Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Period, 1615-1912
June 23 – October 21, 2012 
University of Miami Lowe Art Museum
1301 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33124

Curated by Lowe Art Museum Director and Chief Curator, Brian A. Dursum, this exhibition features 225 mixed media works, and is drawn entirely from the permanent collection of the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami. It will feature paintings, sculpture, prints, ceramics, and lacquer from the 17th-early 20th century. Themes of the exhibition include the influences outsiders on Japan during this time. Europeans and countries like China and Korea left their mark on the culture, artwork, and trade. The Europeans first arrived in Japan in the early 17th century and are represented in artwork of the time period. The Chinese specifically influenced the development of the tea ceremony in Japan as well as the development of the literati or Nanga painting style and Korean influence was felt in the development of the porcelain industry.

Like China, the Japanese developed a society in which artisans developed schools with disciples who followed their beliefs and adopted their family name. This is the case with the Utagawa School of printmakers as well as with many of the Nanga artists. Both printmakers and painters formed fast friendships with some of their contemporaries with whom they might exchange works of art.

Introspection and Awakening also features some early examples from the various painting schools including the official Kano school— which produced large scale works, including decorative screens, for the various palaces of the shogun and feudal lords (daimyo) of the time. Also included in the exhibition are the more popular schools, including Nanga, Rimpa, Ukiyo-e, and Zenga, which was popular with the both the samurai and the rising middle classes. A selection of over 75 woodblock prints from the 17th through the early 20th century will trace the development of this art form from the early works of Harunobu and Toyokuni to the development of the Utagawa School, which dominated the 19th century. The Japanese life style and belief structure of the period is reflected in all its artistic forms. This life style is best represented in the woodblock prints of the period, which capture the famous Kabuki actors of the period, the life in the Yoshiwara entertainment district, wrestling matches, views of daily life, and spiritual beliefs.
While the Japanese always had an artistically advanced pottery industry, which was primarily for domestic consumption, the development of a porcelain industry in the first quarter of the 17th century allowed the Japanese potters to produce porcelains for the international market for the first time. Many of these ceramics were made for the Dutch and South Asian trade. Depictions of Europeans were made as early as the 17th century in a variety of media, including woodblock prints, paintings, screens, lacquer, and netsuke.

The arrival of Admiral Perry in 1854 startled the Japanese into the realization of how vulnerable they had become. This ultimately lead to the end of Japan’s more inward or introspective Edo Period and the arrival of Meiji Period, which promoted self-strengthening, learning from the foreigners to beat them at their own game and to reverse  the unequal treaties signed with the West, which initially forced pried Japan open itself to the outside world.

Above Image Captions:

(top) Utagawa Kunisada (Toyokuni III), Japan, 1786-1865,Gathering Bamboo Shoots, ca. 1850, woodcut, 14 3/8 x 9 7/8″
Museum purchase through funds from Beaux Arts, 2009.8.1

(bottom) Utagawa Kunisada (Toyokuni III), Japan, 1786-1865,Sawamura Tosho II as Enya Hangan Takasada, ca. 1859
woodcut, 14 1/4 x 10″, Museum purchase through funds from an Anonymous Donor, 2009.9.5

Hasegawa Sadanobu, Japan, 1809-1879

Woman as Poem Reader, 1840s
hand colored woodcut, 9 3/4 x 6 1/2″
Gift of Dr. David Klein, 74.006.801

Shigemasa, Japan, active 1801-1829

Shunga, not dated
woodcut, 6 1/8 x 8 1/2″
Museum purchase, 2007.39.3

Kikukawa Eizan, Japan, 1787-1867

Tsuki [Moon] from the Furyu Setsu Gekka [Fashionable Snow, Moon and Flowers] Series, 1807
hand colored woodcut, 15 1/8 x 10 1/8″
Museum purchase through funds from Diane and David Cassel, 2006.6

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